Tag Archive | the GDMBR

How to get a dinner invitation… while smelling to high heaven.

The following is an excerpt from my book The Divide. Read more about the book and see the index of excerpts here, and find the ebook for purchase here.

“Are you broke down,” the driver asked. He wore a blue plaid shirt under a set of red Carhartt suspenders, white hair blended into gray sideburns that faded back to snow white on his chin.

“Oh no, I’m just lubing the chain.” I arched my back into a stretch.

“You must be doing that bike race.”

“Well, I’m not racing, but I am riding the route.”

A woman spoke from the passenger seat of the car. We all talked a bit about the route and the documentary that had a scene filmed at the church we stood outside of.

“Do you two know this road pretty well?”

“Sure do.”

“Good. I’m trying to avoid the rain and mud and am thinking of following this road to get to Silver City. Is there anything on this road? Any place I’ll be able to stop?”

Without a look to his passenger, the driver said, “Yeah. Mile marker 23.”

Mile marker 23? Now here’s a man that knew how to give directions. I laughed with his specificity. “What’s at mile marker 23?”

With a quick glance at his wife this time, “Well, we are.”

I glanced around for a mile marker. “You mean we’re at 23 right here?”

“No. I mean us,” he said pointing to himself and his wife. “Our home is at mile marker 23. Why don’t you stop by. We’ll feed you and let you used the spare bed, get a good night of sleep. How does that sound?”

Too good to be true. “Well, how far is it from here?”

“I’d say about 25 miles.”

“Well, that sounds wonderful then,” I said, not sure what to make of the situation. We hadn’t even introduced ourselves, but I had accepted an invitation to dinner. Strange? Maybe a little. But I wouldn’t have to stay if I felt at all uncomfortable.

“All right. What would you like for dinner?”

Like? I must have looked ridiculous, slack-jawed and sweat-stained. I was still so surprised at having been invited to dinner that I couldn’t comprehend deciding what dinner would be. “I’m not a picky eater, especially these days.”

“All right. Can we take your bags for you and lighten your load?”

“Oh no, I’ll hold on to those.” I didn’t have any suspicion of foul play. To give up the bags was another step toward an easy ride that I didn’t want to take. An easier route to avoid weather was one thing; pawning my gear off onto somebody else was quite different. “Mile maker 23, right? I think it will be a couple of hours before I get there.”

“We’ll be there. Just ride on in.”

“Ok. I’ll see you soon.”

Something you should get out of your system.

The following is an excerpt from my book The DivideRead more about the book and see the index of excerpts here. See Mike & Maggie’s website here.

Mike took the lead again. “So what made you want to do this anyway?”

“Well, I had recently finished school and just wasn’t sure what I wanted to do… I thought it would be a pretty cool item for the life resume, a good challenge. I thought I’d come out here and try to find myself.”

At that last statement, Mike chuckled and said, “Yeah, get that out of your system.”

I thought I saw Maggie turn her head just slightly to Mike and give a look of incredulity at what he had just said. Then again, maybe I was the incredulous one and had just imagined Maggie was on my side.

“Well that’s great, Nathan,” Maggie said, “has it been a good experience so far?”

I thought about it before I answered. “Yeah, it has.”

We talked a few more minutes before I let them go. Decided on my course, I started on the 6 miles of pavement up toward La Manga Pass.

Mike had said, “Get that out of your system.” I couldn’t get that out of my head. I didn’t take offense to what he said. I wasn’t insulted. In a weird way, I was inspired. But why?

Out of my system!

What Mike said had clicked. Being inspired by his statement didn’t seem strange any more, rather it made perfect sense. I had said the trip was, in part, an attempt to “find myself.” Well, where did I go? Did I lose myself? Was my body just mindlessly wandering around without me? No! So what the hell was I looking for!

In my study of philosophy I had read about switching our energy from action to contemplation. This made no sense to me when I read it. Wasn’t that counterproductive? But Plato, he defined contemplation as “knowing and being.” We should switch our energy from “seeking and becoming” to “knowing and being.” Switch your energy from seeking to knowing. What was it I sought?

I had been suffering from the illusion of an internal separateness. I had thought there were two versions of me: the person I was and the person I wanted to be. I was searching for that other person, as if there were a secret that other person had, as if he knew what I wanted and needed, what was best for me, what I should do. What a bunch of bullshit. Mike was right, I needed to get that kind of thinking out of my system.

The wind will drive you crazy.

The following excerpt is from my book The Divide. Read more about the book and see the index of excerpts here.

The wind was ceaseless. It filled the sails of the boat and pushed me further out to sea. It raised bumps on my skin as well, but the sun was bright and the sky clear. I breathed the ocean salt and bid farewell to land as it retreated over the horizon. I turned to face the ocean ahead of me and said goodbye to a love lost. Laurie. We had been in love. She had been a fairy tale.

I met her before I started college and only knew her briefly. We lived far away from each other and fell out of touch. It wasn’t until after my first novel was published that we reconnected. I had been traveling around the country to promote my book when I landed near her home. She came to a book signing. I recognized her instantly, but I didn’t let it show on my face. She walked up to the table and handed me her copy.

I can’t remember what I said, but it made her laugh. Her laugh was the greatest and sounded just how I remembered. She scanned my face for any sign of recognition, but I played it off like she was another person in the crowd. I handed her book back and her face fell.

She was halfway to the door when I called out her name and told her to read the inscription.

Laurie — You are even more beautiful than I remember, which was already more than I thought possible. Please have lunch with me.

That was the beginning of our relationship. We were together for several months, but the distance made it hard. She flew cross-country to visit me for a weekend. She broke it off. She went back east; I went further west and refused to stop at the ocean. The wind carried me away from all of that pain. Or so I thought. What if I hadn’t gone west? What if I had followed Laurie east? What if I had tried to make it work? What was it about tragedy that I found so appealing?

Wait.

I didn’t get on that sailboat. I didn’t have a relationship with Laurie. I never wrote an inscription in her book.

I never wrote a book.

I never left my bike.

But the wind was ceaseless.

One piece of gear to never get wet… don’t lose it either.

The following is an excerpt from my book The Divide. Read more about the book and see the index of excerpts here, and find the ebook for purchase here.

Another rough and steep section of road brought me down to the valley floor and onto a smoother road. I sighed and looked over my shoulder back at the hill, glad to leave behind that awful road. I pedaled half a mile on the new road before I reached back to tap my sleeping bag. Huh? I reached back again. Nothing. I locked up my brakes.

“Where the hell is my sleeping bag?!”

It was rhetoric, frustration, dramatization. I knew where it was: laying on the side of the road where it fell as I crossed a rough patch. I cursed myself for having been so stupid. Everyday the straps had loosened. Everyday I had reached back to check the straps. Everyday I had stopped to wrench the straps tight. Why would I do all of that if I didn’t suspect I might lose my bag? Now it had happened. Now I had to climb back up an incredibly rough road to search for it. I didn’t have the energy or the patience to do it. What choice did I have though? Answer: a simple one.

I turned my bike around and followed my own tracks backwards, through the mud. My head was heavy and wanted to hang, but I held it up as best as I could, keeping an eye out for the white and black stuff sack that held my sleeping bag. Maybe I would get lucky. Maybe it had fallen off recently and I wouldn’t have to back track far. Maybe? Yeah right.

Wait. What was that sound?

ATVs. Three. They came from the direction I should have been heading. I stopped the leader and explained my situation.

“Your sleeping bag?”

“Yeah, I lost it on a rough section of the road but didn’t realize it until a few minutes ago. Can you just keep an eye out for it? If you see it, just set it on the road or if you’re heading back just bring it?”

“Well, I suppose. Which road did you say you came down?”

“There’s a turn just a couple hundred yards from here. I came down the road on the right.”

“Oh, well we are going to the left. Sorry.”

The older guy, mid fifties, pulled away without so much as a goodbye. The next two ATVs followed his lead and their occupants didn’t say anything as they passed and then disappeared over the next hill.

“Selfish pricks!”

They went on, not wanting to help, not even caring. This was the first time I had asked for help and had not received it.  It wasn’t that I had expected them to go out of their way to help me, but a little compassion and empathy would have gone much further than they did. They had had no idea the effort it would take me to backtrack to find something they could retrieve in a few minutes. I hated those ridiculous side-by-side, bench seat ATVs. They didn’t look all-terrain with their small wheels and low ground clearance. Probably modified for a ranch. A tourist ranch. That would explain the kids in the trio. I had probably ran into a family on vacation, out to see the countryside so the parents could instill good values and such in their children, like avoiding weird cyclists in the middle of nowhere.

Why you should climb above the pass.

The following is an excerpt from my book The Divide. Read more about the book and see the index of excerpts here, and find the ebook for purchase here.

The route transitioned to the highway, which made for an easy climb. The hard surface at a manageable grade had me in good spirits and feeling sorry for the motorcycle owners that passed me, some of them decked out in leather while others pulled trailers. Nine miles of steady pedaling brought me to the Continental Divide. Here, the route followed a dirt road into the mountains. It was not a good road. It was washed out, bumpy, and after a mile of being jarred my legs began to burn. Why was I still climbing if I had already crested the Divide? My question was answered by the road’s first view.

I saw an immensity. Mountains extended past the horizon, each successive ridge achieving a lighter shade of blue until the snow of the furthest peaks couldn’t be distinguished from the distant pale-blue clouds; it was as if the clouds had chosen not to precipitate, but rather just laid themselves directly upon the mountain tops. The pines were a patchwork: green with growth, brown with burning heat, gray with decay, all shades present between the sun and the shade. My road laid at the top of the meadow that extended down slope and fanned out below me. The crisp blades bowed to the wildflower’s blue hue and the patches of dandelions, still yellow in their late bloom. A line of trees wandered through the meadow to mark the path of its stream that was fed by an alpine lake trapped somewhere above me. I couldn’t move. My breathing had stalled until my first, long, deep breath brought the wind and colors and emotions of the mountains into my lungs.

Gravity can crush you…

The following is an excerpt from my book The Divide. Read more about the book and see the index of excerpts here, and find the ebook for purchase here.

I pushed my bike back to the bottom of that single track. My spirit was crushed when I looked up the hill. I had a strong desire to cry, but I couldn’t. I know. I tried. I decided it was frustration that made most people cry. I was certainly frustrated at this point, but I was frustrated at knowing what I had to do. This was different from the frustration resulting from not knowing what to do.

Because I had a course of action, I couldn’t cry. There was still something to be done, still some hope that the situation could be redeemed. My body wouldn’t allow me to cry while there was still a chance like that. It was another example of this life’s simplicity. Ride down the wrong hill, push your bike back to the top.

Why weather advisories and late employees don’t mix.

The following is an excerpt from my book The Divide. Read more about the book and see the index of excerpts here, and find the ebook for purchase here.

“You’re going to be riding your bike today?” The hotel clerk couldn’t help but ask, her mouth slightly open and head cocked to the side. She was nine minutes late opening the front desk. Maybe she was one of the karaoke singers in the bar last night, the bar directly underneath my room. Lullabies hadn’t yet made a comeback in the karaoke world and I regretted that fact as I laid in bed the night before, staring at the ceiling, thinking about how much I needed to sleep.

The next morning, my bike was packed and propped against the wall next to the hotel door. I had already donned my rain gear, backpack, and helmet. I had paced, back and forth. Outside, the sky was a uniform gray. The pacing had continued while I waited for her to show up, glancing at the clock every few seconds. Nine minutes would normally not be an issue for me. Today was different though.

“That’s the plan. I’m starting early so I can try to outrun the rain this afternoon,” I said.

“This afternoon? I think it’s going to start raining any second. That’s how the clouds looked on my way in,” she said, her head cocking further and further.

“Well, it’s the afternoon rain I’m most worried about.”

“You mean the advisory?”

Yes, the advisory. When you spend a great deal of time outside, you have an inflated interest in the weather. Watching the news the night before, hoping to catch a forecast, I learned that Environment Canada had issued a Heavy Rainfall Advisory to southern Alberta and all of British Columbia for the afternoon of my third day.

“Yes, I mean the advisory,” I said while I signed my name and turned over my room key.

“You plan to ride your bike through that? That’s supposed to be a really big storm. You won’t stop before then?”

“I don’t know. I’m just going to see how things go, but I’d like to get ahead of it. I can’t imagine being caught in it would be very fun.”

“Well, good luck. I hope you make it through ok.”

“Thanks, so do I.”

I wheeled my bike through the door, eyelids heavy and my ears still ringing with Bon Jovi, but I felt both poised and determined. The afternoon was a long way off and I aimed to cover as much ground as I could until the rain started to fall.

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